Chlamydia, gonorrhea rates up among young women in the US

Lifestyle

There has been an age shift in positivity for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae among women, according to a study published online Aug. 20 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Harvey W. Kaufman, M.D., from Quest Diagnostics in Secaucus, New Jersey, and colleagues assessed trends in positivity over time using all Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae cotesting laboratory results from women and girls tested at Quest Diagnostics between 2010 and 2017 (aged 12 to 30 years; 17,794,680 patients).

The researchers observed a declining trend in Chlamydia trachomatis positivity from 2010 to 2017 for the youngest age group (12 to 17 years; 17 percent decline) but increasing trends for women aged 18 to 24 years (21 percent increase) and 25 to 30 years (50 percent increase). Similarly, Neisseria gonorrhoeae positivity trended downward from 2010 to 2017 for the youngest age group (12 to 17 years; 14 percent decline) but trended upward for women aged 18 to 24 years (27 percent increase) and 25 to 30 years (117 percent increase).

“Health care providers may want to consider this positivity rate age shift in Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae to inform prevention and control strategies, including considering the potential for increased risk in women aged 25 to 30 years,” the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to Quest Diagnostics.